How long will my protective order last?

If you are the victim of domestic abuse in Charlotte, you have ways to protect yourself from your abuser under North Carolina law. One option is to file a civil action to obtain a Domestic Violence Word Clouddomestic violence protective order (DVPO), which is also referred to in our state as a restraining order, a 50B order, or a no-contact order.

Your order will prevent your abuser from having any contact with you. However, it is only in effect for a certain length of time. It is important to know how long it will last so that you can take additional steps to protect yourself before it expires.

Two Types of DVPO Orders

There are two types of no-contact orders that you can obtain when you file a DVPO petition. They are:

  • Ex-parte temporary protective order. This type of order is designed to give you immediate protection from being abused. You may be able to obtain this order immediately if the judge believes that you are in imminent danger.
  • DVPO final order. A final domestic violence protection order can be issued after a full hearing. It will prohibit your abuser from abusing, threatening, assaulting, or harassing you, having any contact with you or your children, and more.

How Long Do Domestic Violence Protections Orders Protect You?

An ex-parte temporary protective order will be in effect for a short period of time. The temporary order will only last until a hearing on your final order, which will usually take place within 10 days, or within seven days of the date your abuser is served with the temporary order, whichever is later.

The final restraining order will protect you for one year from the date of the order. However, you can have it extended for an additional two years. To get this additional protection, you must file a petition for the extension before the original order expires.

Are you the victim of domestic abuse or accused of abusing someone? Our experienced criminal defense attorneys are here to help. Call our Charlotte office to schedule your free, no-obligation case evaluation today.